Dear Analyst https://www.thekeycuts.com/category/podcast/ A show made for analysts: data, data analysis, and software. Sun, 28 Apr 2019 11:34:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2 This is a podcast made by a lifelong analyst. I cover topics including Excel, data analysis, and tools for sharing data. In addition to data analysis topics, I may also cover topics related to software engineering and building applications. I also do a roundup of my favorite podcasts and episodes. KeyCuts clean episodic KeyCuts info@thekeycuts.com info@thekeycuts.com (KeyCuts) A show made for analysts: data, data analysis, and software. Dear Analyst https://www.thekeycuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/dear_analyst_logo-1.png https://www.thekeycuts.com/category/podcast/ youaintallthatandabagofchips@gmail.com This is a podcast made by a lifelong analyst. I cover topics including Excel, data analysis, and tools for sharing data. In addition to data analysis topics, I may also cover topics related to software engineering and building applications. I also do a roundup of my favorite podcasts and episodes. TV-G New York, NY 50542147 Should you ditch Microsoft Excel for Google Sheets? https://www.thekeycuts.com/google-sheets/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/google-sheets/#respond Mon, 13 May 2019 14:07:07 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48781 Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel? An age-old question since Google Sheets came onto the scene in 2006. Many saw Google Sheets just as a copycat of Excel that lacked most of Excel’s features. Over the years, Google Sheets has caught up with Excel’s many features including the number of formulas, PivotTables, and even macros. To […]

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Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel? An age-old question since Google Sheets came onto the scene in 2006. Many saw Google Sheets just as a copycat of Excel that lacked most of Excel’s features. Over the years, Google Sheets has caught up with Excel’s many features including the number of formulas, PivotTables, and even macros. To show how important this question is, my answer on Quora about this topic is my most viewed answer.

Falling out of love with Microsoft Excel

In this episode, I discuss why the answer is not so black and white, and really depends on your use case with data. I review an article written by Dan Kopf for Quartz called “I fell out of love with Microsoft Excel, because Google Sheets is better.” It’s not too often we see a mainstream article about Excel and Google Sheets, so give this article a read if you would like to see one person’s thought process behind ditching Excel.

Spoiler alert: the main reason Dan ditches Excel is due to a sorting bug he encountered in early 2018.

Microsoft Excel versus Gogole Sheets
The battle between Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets.

Other podcasts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/google-sheets/feed/ 0 48781
Why I started contributing to the Excel community https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-community/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-community/#respond Mon, 06 May 2019 10:49:13 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48767 Given that this is the 10th episode of the Dear Analyst podcast, I thought it would be relevant to reflect on how I got started with KeyCuts and joined various Excel communities. I never thought I’d make it to 10 episodes, but here we are! Excel communities Like many online communities, I got started with […]

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Given that this is the 10th episode of the Dear Analyst podcast, I thought it would be relevant to reflect on how I got started with KeyCuts and joined various Excel communities. I never thought I’d make it to 10 episodes, but here we are!

dear analyst 10th episode

Excel communities

Like many online communities, I got started with the Excel community by connecting with a few bloggers who wrote about Excel back in the day. I then started attending meetups and events like Modeloff, and international financial modeling competition (read some of my previous blog posts about Modeloff here). Initially KeyCuts started as a company to sell a keyboard cover product, but it eventually transformed into freelance consulting gigs, creating blog posts and YouTube content, and more recently the Dear Analyst podcast.

Other podcasts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

The post Why I started contributing to the Excel community appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-community/feed/ 0 Given that this is the 10th episode of the Dear Analyst podcast, I thought it would be relevant to reflect on how I got started with KeyCuts and joined various Excel communities. I never thought I’d make it to 10 episodes, but here we are! Given that this is the 10th episode of the Dear Analyst podcast, I thought it would be relevant to reflect on how I got started with KeyCuts and joined various Excel communities. I never thought I’d make it to 10 episodes, but here we are!







Excel communities



Like many online communities, I got started with the Excel community by connecting with a few bloggers who wrote about Excel back in the day. I then started attending meetups and events like Modeloff, and international financial modeling competition (read some of my previous blog posts about Modeloff here). Initially KeyCuts started as a company to sell a keyboard cover product, but it eventually transformed into freelance consulting gigs, creating blog posts and YouTube content, and more recently the Dear Analyst podcast.



Other podcasts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* Acquired: Season 4 Episode 4 – The Lyft IPO* Software Engineering Daily: Bubbles with Haseeb Qureshi

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Dear Analyst clean 30:55 48767
Count the number of blank values in a range in Excel https://www.thekeycuts.com/count-the-number-of-blank-values-in-a-range-in-excel/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/count-the-number-of-blank-values-in-a-range-in-excel/#respond Mon, 29 Apr 2019 11:33:37 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48753 If you want to count the number of cells with blank values in them, you may think it’s as simple as using the COUNTBLANK() formula. Usually you do this if you want to know how much data is missing in your data set. Say you have a list of 10 students, and if a student […]

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If you want to count the number of cells with blank values in them, you may think it’s as simple as using the COUNTBLANK() formula. Usually you do this if you want to know how much data is missing in your data set. Say you have a list of 10 students, and if a student is missing from the set, you want to quickly count how many students are missing from your data range.

However, using COUNTBLANK in this manner only works if you have the exact cell references for your range of data (e.g. “A1:A20”). What if you don’t know the exact cell range? In this episode, I talk about a small trick I learned about how to count the number of blank cells when you give the COUNTBLANK()formula a dynamic column reference as opposed to a specific range of cells. I discovered the answer in a Mr. Excel forum thread about this exact issue.

Say you have the following list of students, and you want to count the number of cells with a value, you would simply use the COUNTA() function like so:

This gets you a count of 8 students. You will notice that there are two “blanks” in rows 4 and 7. How would you count the number of blanks in these 10 cells? You could use a COUNTBLANK() function like so:

Easy enough right? This formula gives you the answer of 2. However, sometimes your formula for counting the number of blanks may not be right below your actual range of data, and you may not know the exact cell references do your range. In the below case, the result of the COUNTBLANK() function leads to an answer of 1048568 which is a lot of empty cells!

What’s happening is Excel is counting all the blank cells below row 10 which is not really part of my data set. How would I tell Excel to only count the number of blank cells in my data range (A1:A10) when given an entire column reference?

The entire formula for the above scenario would be the following:

=COUNTBLANK(A1:INDEX(A:A,MATCH(REPT("Z",255),A:A)))

What’s interesting about this formula is that it only requires you to know the “top” of your range which is the “A1” reference. The REPT() function is a new one I haven’t used before, and this function creates the value “ZZZ[…]” in whatever cell you choose (the “Z” letter repeated 255 times). The MATCH(REPT("Z",255),A:A) part of the formula is a common formula to find the row number of the last cell with a value in your data set. Similar to VLOOKUP(), the MATCH() function also has a lookup_type parameter when set to “1” or omitted, will do a fuzzy or approximate lookup on your data set. It tries to find the the largest value that is equal to or less than the value you are trying to match against.

In this case, since REPT("Z", 255) results in a value that you will most likely not have in your data set and is the “last” value you would find if used in a data set, the MATCH() function return the next largest value which is the last cell with text in your range (e.g. cell “A10” in our example above). Why is the “255” significant? Turns out that this was the character limit for cells in Excel ’95 and earlier, and is still the limit for how Excel stores “records” despite the limit being extended to 31,000 starting with Excel ’97.

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

This episode in The Changelog really resonated with me, and made me think of the Clive Thompson’s Wired article about coders. Clive recently published a book called Coders which is worth checking out.

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/count-the-number-of-blank-values-in-a-range-in-excel/feed/ 0 If you want to count the number of cells with blank values in them, you may think it’s as simple as using the COUNTBLANK() formula. Usually you do this if you want to know how much data is missing in your data set. Say you have a list of 10 students, If you want to count the number of cells with blank values in them, you may think it’s as simple as using the COUNTBLANK() formula. Usually you do this if you want to know how much data is missing in your data set. Say you have a list of 10 students, and if a student is missing from the set, you want to quickly count how many students are missing from your data range.



However, using COUNTBLANK in this manner only works if you have the exact cell references for your range of data (e.g. “A1:A20”). What if you don’t know the exact cell range? In this episode, I talk about a small trick I learned about how to count the number of blank cells when you give the COUNTBLANK()formula a dynamic column reference as opposed to a specific range of cells. I discovered the answer in a Mr. Excel forum thread about this exact issue.



Say you have the following list of students, and you want to count the number of cells with a value, you would simply use the COUNTA() function like so:







This gets you a count of 8 students. You will notice that there are two “blanks” in rows 4 and 7. How would you count the number of blanks in these 10 cells? You could use a COUNTBLANK() function like so:







Easy enough right? This formula gives you the answer of 2. However, sometimes your formula for counting the number of blanks may not be right below your actual range of data, and you may not know the exact cell references do your range. In the below case, the result of the COUNTBLANK() function leads to an answer of 1048568 which is a lot of empty cells!







What’s happening is Excel is counting all the blank cells below row 10 which is not really part of my data set. How would I tell Excel to only count the number of blank cells in my data range (A1:A10) when given an entire column reference?



The entire formula for the above scenario would be the following:



=COUNTBLANK(A1:INDEX(A:A,MATCH(REPT("Z",255),A:A)))



What’s interesting about this formula is that it only requires you to know the “top” of your range which is the “A1” reference. The REPT() function is a new one I haven’t used before, and this function creates the value “ZZZ[…]” in whatever cell you choose (the “Z” letter repeated 255 times). The MATCH(REPT("Z",255),A:A) part of the formula is a common formula to find the row number of the last cell with a value in your data set. Similar to VLOOKUP(), the MATCH() function also has a lookup_type parameter when set to “1” or omitted, will do a fuzzy or approximate lookup on your data set. It tries to find the the largest value that is equal to or less than the value you are trying to match against.



In this case, since REPT("Z", 255) results in a value that you will most likely not have in your data set and is the “last” value you would find if used in a data set, the MATCH() function return the next largest value which is the last cell with text in your range (e.g. cell “A10” in our example above). Why is the “255” significant? Turns out that this was the character limit for cells in Excel ’95 and earlier, and is still the limit for how Excel stores “records” despite the limit being extended to 31,000 starting with Excel ’97.



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* The Changelog: 48753
Best practices for data analysts in the medical field https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-practices-for-data-analysts-in-the-medical-field/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-practices-for-data-analysts-in-the-medical-field/#respond Mon, 22 Apr 2019 09:36:36 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48730 What are some best practices for data analyst working in the medical field? I review this blog post from the Tableau blog by Barry P. Chaiken, MD about the type of analytics used in the medical field, and the trust that must be garnered between the analyst and the physicians. An interesting aspect of doing […]

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]]> What are some best practices for data analyst working in the medical field? I review this blog post from the Tableau blog by Barry P. Chaiken, MD about the type of analytics used in the medical field, and the trust that must be garnered between the analyst and the physicians. An interesting aspect of doing data analysis for medical professionals is that there is so much on the line (patients’ health) if the data is not clean or the analysis is incorrect. Even if the results of your analysis are not life or death, applying that same level of rigor from the medical field will yield positive results for your team or company.

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-practices-for-data-analysts-in-the-medical-field/feed/ 0 What are some best practices for data analyst working in the medical field? I review this blog post from the Tableau blog by Barry P. Chaiken, MD about the type of analytics used in the medical field, and the trust that must be garnered between the ana... What are some best practices for data analyst working in the medical field? I review this blog post from the Tableau blog by Barry P. Chaiken, MD about the type of analytics used in the medical field, and the trust that must be garnered between the analyst and the physicians. An interesting aspect of doing data analysis for medical professionals is that there is so much on the line (patients’ health) if the data is not clean or the analysis is incorrect. Even if the results of your analysis are not life or death, applying that same level of rigor from the medical field will yield positive results for your team or company.



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* Inside Intercom Podcast: Scale #3 – What makes a world class CMO in 2019? And the #1 reason CMOs fail* The Changelog: Episode #339 – Why smart engineers write bad code

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Dear Analyst clean 19:17 48730 The debate over VLOOKUP versus INDEX/MATCH in Excel https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-debate-over-vlookup-versus-index-match-in-excel/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-debate-over-vlookup-versus-index-match-in-excel/#respond Mon, 15 Apr 2019 09:55:21 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48724 Should you use VLOOKUP or INDEX/MATCH in Excel? What are the pros and cons of each method? When you lookup data in Excel, you have the option to use either VLOOKUP or a combination of INDEX and MATCH functions. There is a huge debate over which method to use, and I break down the pros […]

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Should you use VLOOKUP or INDEX/MATCH in Excel? What are the pros and cons of each method? When you lookup data in Excel, you have the option to use either VLOOKUP or a combination of INDEX and MATCH functions. There is a huge debate over which method to use, and I break down the pros and cons of both methods. Long story short, I prefer using VLOOKUP due to its simplicity and the data sets I’m confronted with on a day-to-day basis.

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-debate-over-vlookup-versus-index-match-in-excel/feed/ 0 Should you use VLOOKUP or INDEX/MATCH in Excel? What are the pros and cons of each method? When you lookup data in Excel, you have the option to use either VLOOKUP or a combination of INDEX and MATCH functions. Should you use VLOOKUP or INDEX/MATCH in Excel? What are the pros and cons of each method? When you lookup data in Excel, you have the option to use either VLOOKUP or a combination of INDEX and MATCH functions. There is a huge debate over which method to use, and I break down the pros and cons of both methods. Long story short, I prefer using VLOOKUP due to its simplicity and the data sets I’m confronted with on a day-to-day basis.



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* My Side Project: Glide: David Siegel* The Tim Ferriss Show: Episode 364 – Safi Bahcall — On Thinking Big, Curing Cancer, and Transforming Industries* The Remote Show: Zack Onisko, CEO of Dribbble

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Dear Analyst clean 30:06 48724
Developing the 5 soft skills to be a good analyst https://www.thekeycuts.com/developing-the-5-soft-skills-to-be-a-good-analyst/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/developing-the-5-soft-skills-to-be-a-good-analyst/#respond Mon, 08 Apr 2019 11:02:16 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48717 This is my take on the a blog post written on the Mode blog: How to Develop the Five Soft Skills That Will Make You a Great Analyst. These soft skills are invaluable for all analysts and as Derek mentions in the blog post, helps you move up in your career. The most important soft […]

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This is my take on the a blog post written on the Mode blog: How to Develop the Five Soft Skills That Will Make You a Great Analyst. These soft skills are invaluable for all analysts and as Derek mentions in the blog post, helps you move up in your career. The most important soft skill, in my opinion, is being able to tell a story with the data. That skill, by far, has helped me the most with my career as an analyst.

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

Finally, there’s a YouTuber/comedian named KRAZAM who posted this amazing video about being an Excel “pro” and gives his take about recent Excel patches in the style of a video game Twitch streamer. He aptly goes by the name “MAKRO” in the video :).

The post Developing the 5 soft skills to be a good analyst appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/developing-the-5-soft-skills-to-be-a-good-analyst/feed/ 0 This is my take on the a blog post written on the Mode blog: How to Develop the Five Soft Skills That Will Make You a Great Analyst. These soft skills are invaluable for all analysts and as Derek mentions in the blog post, This is my take on the a blog post written on the Mode blog: How to Develop the Five Soft Skills That Will Make You a Great Analyst. These soft skills are invaluable for all analysts and as Derek mentions in the blog post, helps you move up in your career. The most important soft skill, in my opinion, is being able to tell a story with the data. That skill, by far, has helped me the most with my career as an analyst.



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* Acquired: LP sneak peek: How to build a successful SaaS company* Syntax: Episode 126 – Bootcamps vs School vs Self-learning



Finally, there’s a YouTuber/comedian named KRAZAM who posted this amazing video about being an Excel “pro” and gives his take about recent Excel patches in the style of a video game Twitch streamer. He aptly goes by the name “MAKRO” in the video :).







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Dear Analyst clean 33:45 48717
The best ways to learn Excel https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-best-ways-to-learn-excel/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-best-ways-to-learn-excel/#respond Mon, 01 Apr 2019 10:36:31 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48710 What are the best ways to learn Excel? How do I get good at Excel? I’ve been asked this question many times in person or online, and even wrote some answers online. I discuss not only the best ways to learn Excel, but also what the core concepts you should learn to be the most […]

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What are the best ways to learn Excel? How do I get good at Excel? I’ve been asked this question many times in person or online, and even wrote some answers online. I discuss not only the best ways to learn Excel, but also what the core concepts you should learn to be the most effective at work when using Excel.

I am a big believer in the pareto principle, or as Tim Ferriss calls it, the Minimum Effective Dose to learn the least amount to get the most done. This concept can also be applied to learning Excel. Some strategies for learning Excel include enrolling in a full-time in-person class, taking an online class (like this Skillshare one :)), watching YouTube videos, or taking apart an existing Excel file (my preferred choice).

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-best-ways-to-learn-excel/feed/ 0 What are the best ways to learn Excel? How do I get good at Excel? I’ve been asked this question many times in person or online, and even wrote some answers online. I discuss not only the best ways to learn Excel, What are the best ways to learn Excel? How do I get good at Excel? I’ve been asked this question many times in person or online, and even wrote some answers online. I discuss not only the best ways to learn Excel, but also what the core concepts you should learn to be the most effective at work when using Excel.



I am a big believer in the pareto principle, or as Tim Ferriss calls it, the Minimum Effective Dose to learn the least amount to get the most done. This concept can also be applied to learning Excel. Some strategies for learning Excel include enrolling in a full-time in-person class, taking an online class (like this Skillshare one :)), watching YouTube videos, or taking apart an existing Excel file (my preferred choice).



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* Planet Money: Episode 785 – The Starbury* Under the Skin with Russell Brand: Episode 70 – Heal Yourself with The Ice Shaman (Wim Hof)

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Dear Analyst clean 29:57 48710
The pros and cons of using Excel tables https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-using-excel-tables/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-using-excel-tables/#respond Mon, 25 Mar 2019 10:54:52 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48700 Excel tables are a really powerful feature, but there are pros and cons to the feature depending on if you are an advanced or beginner Excel user. From what I’ve seen, most people who use Excel tables just to get the nice color formatting on the header row and the alternating banded rows color formatting. […]

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Excel tables are a really powerful feature, but there are pros and cons to the feature depending on if you are an advanced or beginner Excel user. From what I’ve seen, most people who use Excel tables just to get the nice color formatting on the header row and the alternating banded rows color formatting. At the end of the day, if you are managing and analyzing a group of cells that are related to each other, turning this range of data into a table will make it easier to maintain the data going forward. I also wrote extensively about turning your data into tables generally in this post on the Coda blog.

Pros for using Excel tables:

  • Structured references to columns in the table over cell references
  • Formulas automatically “fill down” the entire column so you write the formula once
  • New rows that get added to the table automatically expand the borders of the table (no more writing OFFSET formulas!)

Cons for using Excel tables:

  • The name “tables” is confusing, people already have tables/lists of data in their Excel files
  • The syntax for structured references is really difficult to understand (especially for a new Excel user)
  • Editing table names is cumbersome

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-using-excel-tables/feed/ 0 Excel tables are a really powerful feature, but there are pros and cons to the feature depending on if you are an advanced or beginner Excel user. From what I’ve seen, most people who use Excel tables just to get the nice color formatting on the header... Excel tables are a really powerful feature, but there are pros and cons to the feature depending on if you are an advanced or beginner Excel user. From what I’ve seen, most people who use Excel tables just to get the nice color formatting on the header row and the alternating banded rows color formatting. At the end of the day, if you are managing and analyzing a group of cells that are related to each other, turning this range of data into a table will make it easier to maintain the data going forward. I also wrote extensively about turning your data into tables generally in this post on the Coda blog.



Pros for using Excel tables:



* Structured references to columns in the table over cell references* Formulas automatically “fill down” the entire column so you write the formula once* New rows that get added to the table automatically expand the borders of the table (no more writing OFFSET formulas!)



Cons for using Excel tables:



* The name “tables” is confusing, people already have tables/lists of data in their Excel files* The syntax for structured references is really difficult to understand (especially for a new Excel user)* Editing table names is cumbersome



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* The Startup Chat: Episode 391 – How to Create Effective Comparison Pages* Numbers Geek – Steve Ballmer on the U.S. trade deficit* Product Hunt Radio: Episode 158 – Ventura Capital 101 with Eric Bahn

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Dear Analyst clean 35:33 48700
Best way to structure data in Excel for PivotTables https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-way-to-structure-data-in-excel-for-pivottables/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-way-to-structure-data-in-excel-for-pivottables/#respond Mon, 18 Mar 2019 10:30:23 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48692 PivotTables in Excel are a great way to visualize your data. However, in order to easily query and summarize your data in the PivotTable, you need to properly structure your data set before building the PivotTable. Not only is the practice of streamlining your dataset into fewer columns good for PivotTables for different dimensions, this […]

The post Best way to structure data in Excel for PivotTables appeared first on .

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PivotTables in Excel are a great way to visualize your data. However, in order to easily query and summarize your data in the PivotTable, you need to properly structure your data set before building the PivotTable. Not only is the practice of streamlining your dataset into fewer columns good for PivotTables for different dimensions, this is a good practice for putting your data in a regular database down the line. The dataset I used in this episode is the Gender, Institutions and Development Database 2014: Violence against women from the OECD.

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

The post Best way to structure data in Excel for PivotTables appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/best-way-to-structure-data-in-excel-for-pivottables/feed/ 0 PivotTables in Excel are a great way to visualize your data. However, in order to easily query and summarize your data in the PivotTable, you need to properly structure your data set before building the PivotTable. PivotTables in Excel are a great way to visualize your data. However, in order to easily query and summarize your data in the PivotTable, you need to properly structure your data set before building the PivotTable. Not only is the practice of streamlining your dataset into fewer columns good for PivotTables for different dimensions, this is a good practice for putting your data in a regular database down the line. The dataset I used in this episode is the Gender, Institutions and Development Database 2014: Violence against women from the OECD.



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* The Tim Ferriss Show: Episode 359 – Tobi Lütke – From Snowboard Shop to Billion-Dollar Company* JS Party: Episode 64 – TensorFlow.js and Machine Learning in JavaScript* Syntax: Episode 121 – Hasty Treat – Tips to Succeed on YouTube

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Dear Analyst clean 27:57 48692
Top 5 Excel keyboard shortcuts https://www.thekeycuts.com/top-5-excel-keyboard-shortcuts/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/top-5-excel-keyboard-shortcuts/#respond Mon, 11 Mar 2019 10:27:56 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48686 What are your favorite Excel keyboard shortcuts? I talk about my top 5 and why I think they are useful for all analysts. The key takeaway is to stop using your mouse or trackpad on your laptop, and commit to learning these keyboard shortcuts to be more efficient and productive in Excel. My #1 Excel […]

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What are your favorite Excel keyboard shortcuts? I talk about my top 5 and why I think they are useful for all analysts. The key takeaway is to stop using your mouse or trackpad on your laptop, and commit to learning these keyboard shortcuts to be more efficient and productive in Excel. My #1 Excel keyboard shortcut may surprise you since it basically goes against what I talk about in episode 1 :).

I wrote a few articles on the KeyCuts blog about keyboard shortcuts. One of the more popular ones is this one about the top 5 keyboard shortcuts in Mac Excel. A lot of people think you can only use keyboard shortcuts on the PC, but fear not–they also exist on the Mac!

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/top-5-excel-keyboard-shortcuts/feed/ 0 What are your favorite Excel keyboard shortcuts? I talk about my top 5 and why I think they are useful for all analysts. The key takeaway is to stop using your mouse or trackpad on your laptop, and commit to learning these keyboard shortcuts to be more... What are your favorite Excel keyboard shortcuts? I talk about my top 5 and why I think they are useful for all analysts. The key takeaway is to stop using your mouse or trackpad on your laptop, and commit to learning these keyboard shortcuts to be more efficient and productive in Excel. My #1 Excel keyboard shortcut may surprise you since it basically goes against what I talk about in episode 1 :).



I wrote a few articles on the KeyCuts blog about keyboard shortcuts. One of the more popular ones is this one about the top 5 keyboard shortcuts in Mac Excel. A lot of people think you can only use keyboard shortcuts on the PC, but fear not–they also exist on the Mac!



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes from other podcasts I found interesting:



* The Changelog: Episode 205 – A protocol for dying* The Tim Ferriss Show: Episode 353 – Patrick Collison, CEO of Stripe* The Changelog: Episode 331 – GitHub Actions is the next big thing * The Pylon Show: Episode 36

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