Dear Analyst https://www.thekeycuts.com/category/podcast/ A show made for analysts: data, data analysis, and software. Sun, 15 Dec 2019 22:29:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.1 This is a podcast made by a lifelong analyst. I cover topics including Excel, data analysis, and tools for sharing data. In addition to data analysis topics, I may also cover topics related to software engineering and building applications. I also do a roundup of my favorite podcasts and episodes. KeyCuts clean episodic KeyCuts info@thekeycuts.com info@thekeycuts.com (KeyCuts) A show made for analysts: data, data analysis, and software. Dear Analyst https://www.thekeycuts.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/dear_analyst_logo-1.png https://www.thekeycuts.com/category/podcast/ TV-G New York, NY 50542147 Dear Analyst Episode 22: Calculate win streaks for a pool of players in Google Sheets https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-22-calculate-win-streaks-for-a-pool-of-players-in-google-sheets/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-22-calculate-win-streaks-for-a-pool-of-players-in-google-sheets/#respond Mon, 16 Dec 2019 12:16:00 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48929 If you are by your computer, you may want to open this Google Sheet to understand the example discussed in this episode. I walk through a rather long formula involving the FREQUENCY(), COLUMN(), MAX(), and the ARRAYFORMULA() functions in Google Sheets. Here’s the full formula below to calculate win streaks in the Google Sheet: [crayon-5df77d3d06bf3779933053/] […]

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If you are by your computer, you may want to open this Google Sheet to understand the example discussed in this episode. I walk through a rather long formula involving the FREQUENCY(), COLUMN(), MAX(), and the ARRAYFORMULA() functions in Google Sheets.

Here’s the full formula below to calculate win streaks in the Google Sheet:

=ARRAYFORMULA(MAX(FREQUENCY(IF(B2:P2="W",COLUMN(B2:P2)),IF(B2:P2="L",COLUMN(B2:P2)))))

You can see an embed of the Google Sheet below as well:

Calculating win streaks with bye weeks

What made this problem interesting is that if there are Xs in the weeks, those are considered bye weeks for the players and shouldn’t count against the player. In the Google Sheet, you’ll notice that John has a X for Week 3, but has Ws for Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5. Just because he had a bye week for Week 3 means he still has a 4-game winning streak for those 5 weeks.

This question originally appeared on the Mr. Excel forum here. The answer involves (in my opinion) a non-traditional use of the FREQUENCY() function to find the number of Ws for a given player that fall between different weeks where the player took an L.

Array-entered formulas

For those not familiar with the FREQUENCY() function, it’s one of the special functions in Excel that must be array-entered into Excel. Traditionally, this means while you’re editing the formula, you hit CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER to array-enter the formula. In newer versions of Excel, you don’t have do the CSE combination as Excel just knows to apply the formula to an array of cells.

CSE doesn’t exist in Google Sheets, so in order to array-enter formulas, you just use the ARRAYFORMULA() function to tell Google Sheets this formula should be applied to a range of cells.

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Dear Analyst Episode 22: Calculate win streaks for a pool of players in Google Sheets appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-22-calculate-win-streaks-for-a-pool-of-players-in-google-sheets/feed/ 0 If you are by your computer, you may want to open this Google Sheet to understand the example discussed in this episode. I walk through a rather long formula involving the FREQUENCY(), COLUMN(), MAX(), and the ARRAYFORMULA() functions in Google Sheets.... If you are by your computer, you may want to open this Google Sheet to understand the example discussed in this episode. I walk through a rather long formula involving the FREQUENCY(), COLUMN(), MAX(), and the ARRAYFORMULA() functions in Google Sheets.







Here’s the full formula below to calculate win streaks in the Google Sheet:



=ARRAYFORMULA(MAX(FREQUENCY(IF(B2:P2="W",COLUMN(B2:P2)),IF(B2:P2="L",COLUMN(B2:P2)))))



You can see an embed of the Google Sheet below as well:







Calculating win streaks with bye weeks



What made this problem interesting is that if there are Xs in the weeks, those are considered bye weeks for the players and shouldn’t count against the player. In the Google Sheet, you’ll notice that John has a X for Week 3, but has Ws for Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5. Just because he had a bye week for Week 3 means he still has a 4-game winning streak for those 5 weeks.



This question originally appeared on the Mr. Excel forum here. The answer involves (in my opinion) a non-traditional use of the FREQUENCY() function to find the number of Ws for a given player that fall between different weeks where the player took an L.



Array-entered formulas



For those not familiar with the FREQUENCY() function, it’s one of the special functions in Excel that must be array-entered into Excel. Traditionally, this means while you’re editing the formula, you hit CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER to array-enter the formula. In newer versions of Excel, you don’t have do the CSE combination as Excel just knows to apply the formula to an array of cells.



CSE doesn’t exist in Google Sheets, so in order to array-enter formulas, you just use the ARRAYFORMULA() function to tell Google Sheets this formula should be applied to a range of cells.



Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* Freakonomics: Episode #391: America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up

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Dear Analyst Episode 21: Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets https://www.thekeycuts.com/building-no-code-tools-and-applications-from-spreadsheets/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/building-no-code-tools-and-applications-from-spreadsheets/#respond Mon, 18 Nov 2019 11:03:46 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48917 This is my talk from Webflow’s No-Code Conference that took place on November 13th, 2019 in San Francisco. The title of my talk was called Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets. The slides from my presentation are on SlideShare here. Themes from the talk This was my first time talking about my experience with […]

The post Dear Analyst Episode 21: Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets appeared first on .

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This is my talk from Webflow’s No-Code Conference that took place on November 13th, 2019 in San Francisco. The title of my talk was called Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets. The slides from my presentation are on SlideShare here.

Themes from the talk

This was my first time talking about my experience with spreadsheets and the Excel community in a public forum. The three themes I discussed based on my experience using spreadsheets for the last 10+ years are:

  1. Whatever platform you choose to build or make on, the platform should fundamentally challenge your beliefs about what it means to build apps and tools
  2. The technology behind many no-code platforms (including spreadsheets) is not as revolutionary as it may seem
  3. The community of users behind the platform will always be more important than the platform itself

The talk and slides should be published in the next few weeks, but I published my slides already which you can view below:

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Dear Analyst Episode 21: Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/building-no-code-tools-and-applications-from-spreadsheets/feed/ 0 This is my talk from Webflow’s No-Code Conference that took place on November 13th, 2019 in San Francisco. The title of my talk was called Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets. The slides from my presentation are on SlideShare here... This is my talk from Webflow’s No-Code Conference that took place on November 13th, 2019 in San Francisco. The title of my talk was called Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets. The slides from my presentation are on SlideShare here.







Themes from the talk



This was my first time talking about my experience with spreadsheets and the Excel community in a public forum. The three themes I discussed based on my experience using spreadsheets for the last 10+ years are:



* Whatever platform you choose to build or make on, the platform should fundamentally challenge your beliefs about what it means to build apps and tools* The technology behind many no-code platforms (including spreadsheets) is not as revolutionary as it may seem* The community of users behind the platform will always be more important than the platform itself



The talk and slides should be published in the next few weeks, but I published my slides already which you can view below:




Building No-Code Tools and Applications from Spreadsheets from Al Chen




Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* Future of Coding: Episode #43: Unveiling Dark – Ellen Chisa & Paul Biggar* Real Time with Bill Maher: Episode #509: Salman Rushdie, Gina McCarthy, Barney Frank, Linette Lopez, Noah Rothman

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What it’s like teaching a week-long online data analytics course https://www.thekeycuts.com/teaching-weeklong-data-analytics-course/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/teaching-weeklong-data-analytics-course/#comments Mon, 11 Nov 2019 11:30:53 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48909 A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to teach a week-long data analytics course through General Assembly. The course was taught entirely online using Zoom. I discuss some of the topics the students learned in the class, and what the experience was like teaching an online class in real time. The topics we covered […]

The post What it’s like teaching a week-long online data analytics course appeared first on .

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A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to teach a week-long data analytics course through General Assembly. The course was taught entirely online using Zoom. I discuss some of the topics the students learned in the class, and what the experience was like teaching an online class in real time. The topics we covered included Excel, SQL, and Tableau. We also discussed topics relating to data narratives and telling data-driven stories.

Source: General Assembly

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post What it’s like teaching a week-long online data analytics course appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/teaching-weeklong-data-analytics-course/feed/ 2 A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to teach a week-long data analytics course through General Assembly. The course was taught entirely online using Zoom. I discuss some of the topics the students learned in the class, A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to teach a week-long data analytics course through General Assembly. The course was taught entirely online using Zoom. I discuss some of the topics the students learned in the class, and what the experience was like teaching an online class in real time. The topics we covered included Excel, SQL, and Tableau. We also discussed topics relating to data narratives and telling data-driven stories.



Source: General Assembly



Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* Software Engineering Daily: Talking Python with Michael Kennedy* Data Engineering Podcast: Episode #98: Navigating Boundless Data Streams With the Swim Kernel* Hanselminutes: Episode #702: On Being Productive with Cantilever’s Ty Fujimura





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KeyCuts clean 31:40 48909
Dear Analyst Episode 19: Top 5 Signs You’re Using Too Much Excel https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-19-top-5-signs-youre-using-too-much-excel/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-19-top-5-signs-youre-using-too-much-excel/#respond Mon, 21 Oct 2019 10:46:40 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48898 A bit of a click-baity title, but I wanted to talk through some of the signs you know you’re using too much Excel. If you are worried about a friend who is using too much Excel, ask him or her if they recognize any of these signs. This is an episode based on a blog […]

The post Dear Analyst Episode 19: Top 5 Signs You’re Using Too Much Excel appeared first on .

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A bit of a click-baity title, but I wanted to talk through some of the signs you know you’re using too much Excel. If you are worried about a friend who is using too much Excel, ask him or her if they recognize any of these signs. This is an episode based on a blog post I wrote in 2017 on the 10 signs you’re using too much Excel, and I just wanted to focus on the top 5 from that list.

Teaching data analytics

I haven’t posted an episode in a few weeks because I’m preparing to teach a remote course on data analytics through General Assembly. It’s my first time teaching weeklong course about Excel, SQL, and Tableau 100% remotely using Zoom. If you’re interested in learning more about the roucse (and hearing from yours truly), check out the course syllabus here. Once the course is over, I’ll probably do a recap on my experience teaching this course on Dear Analyst.

Source: General Assembly

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Dear Analyst Episode 19: Top 5 Signs You’re Using Too Much Excel appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/dear-analyst-episode-19-top-5-signs-youre-using-too-much-excel/feed/ 0 A bit of a click-baity title, but I wanted to talk through some of the signs you know you’re using too much Excel. If you are worried about a friend who is using too much Excel, ask him or her if they recognize any of these signs. A bit of a click-baity title, but I wanted to talk through some of the signs you know you’re using too much Excel. If you are worried about a friend who is using too much Excel, ask him or her if they recognize any of these signs. This is an episode based on a blog post I wrote in 2017 on the 10 signs you’re using too much Excel, and I just wanted to focus on the top 5 from that list.







Teaching data analytics



I haven’t posted an episode in a few weeks because I’m preparing to teach a remote course on data analytics through General Assembly. It’s my first time teaching weeklong course about Excel, SQL, and Tableau 100% remotely using Zoom. If you’re interested in learning more about the roucse (and hearing from yours truly), check out the course syllabus here. Once the course is over, I’ll probably do a recap on my experience teaching this course on Dear Analyst.



Source: General Assembly



Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* EnterpriseReady: Episode #5 – The Evolution of Enterprise with Edith Harbaugh of LaunchDarkly* ShopTalk Show: Episode #374 – VisBug with Adam Argyle* Data Engineering Podcast: Episode #95 – Building Tools and Platforms for Data Analytics

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Dear Analyst clean 41:05 48898
Excerpts from Range by David Epstein and financial modeling https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-range-by-david-epstein-and-financial-modeling/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-range-by-david-epstein-and-financial-modeling/#respond Mon, 16 Sep 2019 10:57:17 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48884 Range: Why Generalists Triumph In A Specialized World by David Epstein came on my radar after listening to another podcast. Thought the premise was interesting in that people who “dabble” in various interests and hobbies end up excelling (no pun intended) in life and have a more rewarding career. I read a few excerpts that […]

The post Excerpts from Range by David Epstein and financial modeling appeared first on .

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Range: Why Generalists Triumph In A Specialized World by David Epstein came on my radar after listening to another podcast. Thought the premise was interesting in that people who “dabble” in various interests and hobbies end up excelling (no pun intended) in life and have a more rewarding career. I read a few excerpts that show what this book is all about, and how this applies to my journey becoming proficient in Excel and other tools.

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Excerpts from Range by David Epstein and financial modeling appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-range-by-david-epstein-and-financial-modeling/feed/ 0 Range: Why Generalists Triumph In A Specialized World by David Epstein came on my radar after listening to another podcast. Thought the premise was interesting in that people who “dabble” in various interests and hobbies end up excelling (no pun intend... Range: Why Generalists Triumph In A Specialized World by David Epstein came on my radar after listening to another podcast. Thought the premise was interesting in that people who “dabble” in various interests and hobbies end up excelling (no pun intended) in life and have a more rewarding career. I read a few excerpts that show what this book is all about, and how this applies to my journey becoming proficient in Excel and other tools.







Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* Changelog: Episode 353 – The war for soul of open source

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Dear Analyst clean 25:23 48884
Dear Analyst Episode 17: Excel introduces new feature XLOOKUP https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-introduces-new-feature-xlookup/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-introduces-new-feature-xlookup/#respond Tue, 03 Sep 2019 10:22:27 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48865 New Excel feature alert! Probably one of the biggest announcements in a long time from the Excel world: a new function to supplant VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP. What is it you ask? The XLOOKUP function. Summary of XLOOKUP benefits I discuss some of the benefits, implications for new and existing users of Excel, and also some […]

The post Dear Analyst Episode 17: Excel introduces new feature XLOOKUP appeared first on .

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New Excel feature alert! Probably one of the biggest announcements in a long time from the Excel world: a new function to supplant VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP. What is it you ask? The XLOOKUP function.

Summary of XLOOKUP benefits

I discuss some of the benefits, implications for new and existing users of Excel, and also some of the great comments in the announcement blog post. according to the blog post, VLOOKUP is the 3rd most used function in Excel behind SUM and AVERAGE!

Read more from the official Microsoft Excel announcement. The one and only Bill Jelen of MrExcel did a great writeup of the new XLOOKUP function. In short, here are some of my favorite improvements XLOOKUP brings to the traditional VLOOKUP and INDEX/MATCH functions for finding your data:

  • Defaults to exact match on the lookup (no more adding false or 0 in your VLOOKUP formulas)
  • Can insert columns into the range of data where you are doing the lookup without needing to change the column number of the data you want to return
  • Can look to the left of the range (this is already doable with INDEX/MATCH, however)
  • Performance improvements due to the fact you only need to select two columns instead of the whole range for the lookup

XLOOKUP in action

See the XLOOKUP function in action (from the blog post):

What people are saying

Some of my favorite comments from around the web on the new XLOOKUP function:

What a great enhancement. This will be much easier to be taught to beginners – I’m SO looking forward to be able to use and teach this new function! Thank you very much for considering the suggestion.

Katharina_Schwarzer (blog post comment)

I forgot to offer my congratulations to the development team in my earlier post.  For me, traditional Excel appears plagued by ‘cheap and cheerful’ techniques that provide partial solutions but are constructed so as ‘not to place demands upon the end-user’.  All of the new dynamic array functions seem to have brought with them a noticeable greater degree of rigour.  More thought appears to have gone into the planning, so all the use cases that one might reasonably expect seem to be catered for.  Ultimately, this reduces the need for the ‘tips and tricks’ that provide workarounds or guidance where there is overlapping functionality.  Great stuff!

Peter Bartholomew (blog post comment)

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Dear Analyst Episode 17: Excel introduces new feature XLOOKUP appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/excel-introduces-new-feature-xlookup/feed/ 0 New Excel feature alert! Probably one of the biggest announcements in a long time from the Excel world: a new function to supplant VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP. What is it you ask? The XLOOKUP function. Summary of XLOOKUP benefits I discuss some of the benefits... New Excel feature alert! Probably one of the biggest announcements in a long time from the Excel world: a new function to supplant VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP. What is it you ask? The XLOOKUP function.







Summary of XLOOKUP benefits



I discuss some of the benefits, implications for new and existing users of Excel, and also some of the great comments in the announcement blog post. according to the blog post, VLOOKUP is the 3rd most used function in Excel behind SUM and AVERAGE!



Read more from the official Microsoft Excel announcement. The one and only Bill Jelen of MrExcel did a great writeup of the new XLOOKUP function. In short, here are some of my favorite improvements XLOOKUP brings to the traditional VLOOKUP and INDEX/MATCH functions for finding your data:



* Defaults to exact match on the lookup (no more adding false or 0 in your VLOOKUP formulas)* Can insert columns into the range of data where you are doing the lookup without needing to change the column number of the data you want to return* Can look to the left of the range (this is already doable with INDEX/MATCH, however)* Performance improvements due to the fact you only need to select two columns instead of the whole range for the lookup



XLOOKUP in action



See the XLOOKUP function in action (from the blog post):







What people are saying



Some of my favorite comments from around the web on the new XLOOKUP function:




Today I discovered that #XLOOKUP is coming to Excel to effectively replace the VLOOKUP function. My life is complete. I will die a happy man.— Jayesh Navin Shah (@jayeshnavin) August 31, 2019





#Excel is probably one of the first software that anyone learns when they start to look at the numbers. Apparently, the widely used #VLOOKUP function will have an heir to overshadow its glory: #XLOOKUP. https://t.co/7P4rBYca5t— Cem Tekesin (@TekesinCem) August 30, 2019




What a great enhancement. This will be much easier to be taught to beginners – I’m SO looking forward to be able to use and teach this new function! Thank you very much for considering the suggestion.Katharina_Schwarzer (blog post comment)



I forgot to offer my congratulations to the development team in my earlier post.  For me, traditional Excel appears plagued by ‘cheap and cheerful’ techniques that provide partial solutions but are constructed so as ‘not to place demands upon the end-user’.  All of the new dynamic array functions seem to have brought with them a noticeable greater degree of rigour.  More thought appears to have gone into the planning, so all the use cases that one might reasonably expect seem to be catered for.  Ultimately, this reduces the need for the ‘tips and tricks’ that provide workarounds or guidance where there is overlapping functionality.  Great stuff!]]>
Dear Analyst clean 41:24 48865
Dear Analyst Episode 16: The New York Times’ data bootcamp https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-new-york-times-data-bootcamp/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-new-york-times-data-bootcamp/#respond Mon, 19 Aug 2019 10:05:37 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48851 A few months ago, The New York Times’ Digital Transition team headed by Lindsey Cook published a blog post about a data bootcamp they led for their reporters and editors. The New York Times frequently publishes amazing data visualizations, and it’s awesome to see this newsroom pushing their reporters into the world of “data journalism.” […]

The post Dear Analyst Episode 16: The New York Times’ data bootcamp appeared first on .

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A few months ago, The New York Times’ Digital Transition team headed by Lindsey Cook published a blog post about a data bootcamp they led for their reporters and editors. The New York Times frequently publishes amazing data visualizations, and it’s awesome to see this newsroom pushing their reporters into the world of “data journalism.” In the words of Cook:

We wanted to give our reporters the tools and support necessary to incorporate data into their everyday beat reporting, not just in big and ambitious projects.

In this episode, I review some of the materials (Google Drive link) Cook and her team released in the blog post on skills taught during this bootcamp. The entire bootcamp is done in Google Sheets, and some of the skills they teach include importing data, Pivot Tables, cleaning data, and more.

Telling a Data-Driven Story

What I appreciate most about this bootcamp (based on the materials provided) is the focus on using data to tell a story (plug: I have an online class about this subject). It’s one thing to report on the facts, but another to use the data to support the facts. The bootcamp goes into detail on different method reporters can use to present data in a compelling way to their audience. This Google Doc shows some of the methods you can use to create a data-driven story. The graphic below is also a good “cheat sheet” on methods you can use.

The argument for data journalism is shown in these 5 stories from reporters who started using spreadsheets in their stories. In this episode, I highlight the story from John Ismay, an At War reporter who used spreadsheets for the simple purpose of keeping track of characters and event timelines.


Props to the New York Times for releasing these materials for free to the public so that more newsrooms can train their staff to write more data-driven stories!

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Dear Analyst Episode 16: The New York Times’ data bootcamp appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/the-new-york-times-data-bootcamp/feed/ 0 A few months ago, The New York Times’ Digital Transition team headed by Lindsey Cook published a blog post about a data bootcamp they led for their reporters and editors. The New York Times frequently publishes amazing data visualizations, A few months ago, The New York Times’ Digital Transition team headed by Lindsey Cook published a blog post about a data bootcamp they led for their reporters and editors. The New York Times frequently publishes amazing data visualizations, and it’s awesome to see this newsroom pushing their reporters into the world of “data journalism.” In the words of Cook:



We wanted to give our reporters the tools and support necessary to incorporate data into their everyday beat reporting, not just in big and ambitious projects.



In this episode, I review some of the materials (Google Drive link) Cook and her team released in the blog post on skills taught during this bootcamp. The entire bootcamp is done in Google Sheets, and some of the skills they teach include importing data, Pivot Tables, cleaning data, and more.







Telling a Data-Driven Story



What I appreciate most about this bootcamp (based on the materials provided) is the focus on using data to tell a story (plug: I have an online class about this subject). It’s one thing to report on the facts, but another to use the data to support the facts. The bootcamp goes into detail on different method reporters can use to present data in a compelling way to their audience. This Google Doc shows some of the methods you can use to create a data-driven story. The graphic below is also a good “cheat sheet” on methods you can use.







The argument for data journalism is shown in these 5 stories from reporters who started using spreadsheets in their stories. In this episode, I highlight the story from John Ismay, an At War reporter who used spreadsheets for the simple purpose of keeping track of characters and event timelines.







Props to the New York Times for releasing these materials for free to the public so that more newsrooms can train their staff to write more data-driven stories!



Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* a16z: The History and Future of Machine Learning with Professor Tom Mitchell* SyntaxFM: Episode 155: Hasty Treat – Making Yourself Uncomfortable to Grow

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Dear Analyst clean 28:02 48851
Excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-superforecasting/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-superforecasting/#respond Mon, 15 Jul 2019 10:00:30 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48828 I read a few excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner. What does it mean to be a good forecaster? How can we take lessons from the book to be better modelers? I just started reading the book but already have learned so much about forecasting, […]

The post Excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction appeared first on .

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I read a few excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner. What does it mean to be a good forecaster? How can we take lessons from the book to be better modelers? I just started reading the book but already have learned so much about forecasting, and sharing some of my favorite parts of the book so far.

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post Excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/excerpts-from-superforecasting/feed/ 0 I read a few excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner. What does it mean to be a good forecaster? How can we take lessons from the book to be better modelers? I read a few excerpts from Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner. What does it mean to be a good forecaster? How can we take lessons from the book to be better modelers? I just started reading the book but already have learned so much about forecasting, and sharing some of my favorite parts of the book so far.







Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* The Remote Show: Episode 11 – Rebecca Corliss, VP of Marketing at Owl Labs* SyntaxFM: Episode 149 – Hasty Treat – Workshops

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Dear Analyst clean 35:39 48828
How Destiny’s Child put Excel on the map and syncing data between Coda docs https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-destinys-child-put-excel-on-the-map-and-syncing-data-between-coda-docs/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-destinys-child-put-excel-on-the-map-and-syncing-data-between-coda-docs/#respond Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:34:25 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48814 This is probably the most click-baity title for a blog post/podcast about Excel, but we don’t get many of these in the Excel world, right? It all started in 2002 with the Dilemma music video by Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland, and Kelly decided to send a text using Excel. The most important text in the […]

The post How Destiny’s Child put Excel on the map and syncing data between Coda docs appeared first on .

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This is probably the most click-baity title for a blog post/podcast about Excel, but we don’t get many of these in the Excel world, right? It all started in 2002 with the Dilemma music video by Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland, and Kelly decided to send a text using Excel. The most important text in the history of texts: “Where you at? Holla when you get this.” The Excel world has hollered back.

Kelly Rowland texting in Excel from the Dilemma music video

The world responds

A BuzzFeed article came out a few months ago about this 2-second scene from the video. Kelly was interviewed on a show called The Reel and was asked about this incident:

Kelly asked about her questionable text in Excel

This music video has been around for 15+ years and we’re still seeing memes about this momentous text in the interwebs. The fact that Kelly still doesn’t know what Excel is after all these years is mind boggling.

One-way data syncing with Coda

Now back onto regularly scheduled programming. This is the 3rd and final episode in this 3-part series about syncing data. In episode 12, I talked about using the IMPORTRANGE() function for syncing data between Google Sheets. In episode 13, I talked about syncing data using Google Apps Script. This episode is all about syncing data between Coda docs. In case you want to read the full blog post about syncing data, go here.

Here is the Gist with the full script for syncing data between your Coda docs. You’ll have to get the doc IDs and table IDs from the source and target Coda docs you want to sync. Those are set in rows 3-4 and rows 14-30 in the script; but it really depends on how many tables you want to sync.

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post How Destiny’s Child put Excel on the map and syncing data between Coda docs appeared first on .

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https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-destinys-child-put-excel-on-the-map-and-syncing-data-between-coda-docs/feed/ 0 This is probably the most click-baity title for a blog post/podcast about Excel, but we don’t get many of these in the Excel world, right? It all started in 2002 with the Dilemma music video by Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland, This is probably the most click-baity title for a blog post/podcast about Excel, but we don’t get many of these in the Excel world, right? It all started in 2002 with the Dilemma music video by Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland, and Kelly decided to send a text using Excel. The most important text in the history of texts: “Where you at? Holla when you get this.” The Excel world has hollered back.



Kelly Rowland texting in Excel from the Dilemma music video



The world responds



A BuzzFeed article came out a few months ago about this 2-second scene from the video. Kelly was interviewed on a show called The Reel and was asked about this incident:





Kelly asked about her questionable text in Excel



This music video has been around for 15+ years and we’re still seeing memes about this momentous text in the interwebs. The fact that Kelly still doesn’t know what Excel is after all these years is mind boggling.



One-way data syncing with Coda



Now back onto regularly scheduled programming. This is the 3rd and final episode in this 3-part series about syncing data. In episode 12, I talked about using the IMPORTRANGE() function for syncing data between Google Sheets. In episode 13, I talked about syncing data using Google Apps Script. This episode is all about syncing data between Coda docs. In case you want to read the full blog post about syncing data, go here.



Here is the Gist with the full script for syncing data between your Coda docs. You’ll have to get the doc IDs and table IDs from the source and target Coda docs you want to sync. Those are set in rows 3-4 and rows 14-30 in the script; but it really depends on how many tables you want to sync.



Other Podcasts & Blog Posts



In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:



* The Knowledge Project: Episode 6 – Philip Tetlock: How to See the Future

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Dear Analyst clean 28:34 48814
How to sync data using Google Apps Script in Google Sheets https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-to-sync-data-using-google-apps-script-in-google-sheets/ https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-to-sync-data-using-google-apps-script-in-google-sheets/#respond Mon, 10 Jun 2019 10:41:27 +0000 https://www.thekeycuts.com/?p=48800 In episode 12, I talked about how you can use the IMPORTRANGE() function in Google Sheets to import data form a source Google Sheet to a target Google Sheet. In this episode, I get a little more technical and discuss how you can import data using Google Apps Script. If you want to read the […]

The post How to sync data using Google Apps Script in Google Sheets appeared first on .

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In episode 12, I talked about how you can use the IMPORTRANGE() function in Google Sheets to import data form a source Google Sheet to a target Google Sheet. In this episode, I get a little more technical and discuss how you can import data using Google Apps Script. If you want to read the full blog post on how to do one-way syncing, check out this blog post I wrote on the Coda blog.

sync data google sheets google apps script
Source: Google Apps Script

The script for syncing your Google Sheets

Check out this Gist to see the full script — it’s 17 lines long. Here’s the script:

var sourceSpreadsheetID = "TO UPDATE";
var sourceWorksheetName = "TO UPDATE";
var targetSpreadsheetID = "TO UPDATE";
var targetWorksheetName = "TO UPDATE";

function importData() {
  var thisSpreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.openById(sourceSpreadsheetID);
  var thisWorksheet = thisSpreadsheet.getSheetByName(sourceWorksheetName);
  var thisData = thisWorksheet.getDataRange();
  //Uncomment line 11 below and comment out line 9 if you want to sync a named range. Replace "teamBugs" with your named range.
  //var thisData = thisSpreadsheet.getRangeByName("teamBugs");

  var toSpreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.openById(targetSpreadsheetID);
  var toWorksheet = toSpreadsheet.getSheetByName(targetWorksheetName);
  var toRange = toWorksheet.getRange(1, 1, thisData.getNumRows(), thisData.getNumColumns())
  toRange.setValues(thisData.getValues()); 
}

You’ll notice that the only lines you need to edit are lines 1-4 in the script. As long as you have your Google Sheets IDs and sheet name from your source and target docs, you are good to go! I would recommend using Named Ranges in your Google Sheet to allow for situations where you data in your source Google Sheet is dynamic.

Being a maker, millennial burnout, and Google Sheets as a database

Normally I just link to the other podcasts and blog posts I comment on in the 2nd half of each episode, but I think it is worth writing a bit about the other podcasts and blog posts this time.

Adam Savage’s interview on The Tim Ferris Show embodies the spirit of being a maker. I think it’s easy to be a maker these days in the software/digital space, but there is a whole world out there of makers who are making with physical products. I would definitely give this episode a listen as well as checking out Adam’s book Every Tool’s A Hammer.

Source: Norman Chan

In the Product Hunt Radio episode with Danielle Morrill, I was reminded of this article about millennial burnout. I don’t fully agree with the character traits imbued upon millennials by the media. This article, however, did have some nuggets that I do agree with (such as the bit about finances). At a higher perspective, Danielle also discusses how we (millennials) find our community and purpose through our work instead of through traditional community, civic, and religious groups from decades before.

Finally, back to spreadsheets, Eric’s blog post about spreadsheets not being a database is one of the better articles I’ve seen about this topic geared towards non-technical folks. Check out the talk he gave at Cloud Next 2019.

Other Podcasts & Blog Posts

In the 2nd half of the episode, I talk about some episodes and blogs from other people I found interesting:

The post How to sync data using Google Apps Script in Google Sheets appeared first on .

]]>
https://www.thekeycuts.com/how-to-sync-data-using-google-apps-script-in-google-sheets/feed/ 0 In episode 12, I talked about how you can use the IMPORTRANGE() function in Google Sheets to import data form a source Google Sheet to a target Google Sheet. In this episode, I get a little more technical and discuss how you can import data using Googl... In episode 12, I talked about how you can use the IMPORTRANGE() function in Google Sheets to import data form a source Google Sheet to a target Google Sheet. In this episode, I get a little more technical and discuss how you can import data using Google Apps Script. If you want to read the full blog post on how to do one-way syncing, check out this blog post I wrote on the Coda blog.



Source: Google Apps Script



The script for syncing your Google Sheets



Check out this Gist to see the full script — it’s 17 lines long. Here’s the script:



var sourceSpreadsheetID = "TO UPDATE";
var sourceWorksheetName = "TO UPDATE";
var targetSpreadsheetID = "TO UPDATE";
var targetWorksheetName = "TO UPDATE";

function importData() {
var thisSpreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.openById(sourceSpreadsheetID);
var thisWorksheet = thisSpreadsheet.getSheetByName(sourceWorksheetName);
var thisData = thisWorksheet.getDataRange();
//Uncomment line 11 below and comment out line 9 if you want to sync a named range. Replace "teamBugs" with your named range.
//var thisData = thisSpreadsheet.getRangeByName("teamBugs");

var toSpreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.openById(targetSpreadsheetID);
var toWorksheet = toSpreadsheet.getSheetByName(targetWorksheetName);
var toRange = toWorksheet.getRange(1, 1, thisData.getNumRows(), thisData.getNumColumns())
toRange.setValues(thisData.getValues());
}



You’ll notice that the only lines you need to edit are lines 1-4 in the script. As long as you have your Google Sheets IDs and sheet name from your source and target docs, you are good to go! I would recommend using Named Ranges in your Google Sheet to allow for situations where you data in your source Google Sheet is dynamic.



Being a maker, millennial burnout, and Google Sheets as a database



Normally I just link to the other podcasts and blog posts I comment on in the 2nd half of each episode, but I think it is worth writing a bit about the other podcasts and blog posts this time.



Adam Savage’s interview on The Tim Ferris Show embodies the spirit of being a maker. I think it’s easy to be a maker these days in the software/digital space, but there is a whole world out there of makers who are making with physical products. I would definitely give this episode a listen as well as checking out Adam’s book Every Tool’s A Hammer.



Source: Norman Chan



In the Product Hunt Radio episode with Danielle Morrill, I was reminded of this article about millennial burnout. I don’t fully agree with the character traits imbued upon millennials by the media. This article, however, did have some nuggets that I do agree with (such as the bit about finances).]]>
Dear Analyst clean 32:21 48800